Elected Officials

Rick Berg

Congressman (R)

If you had the power to change one law, what would it be?
The simple fact remains: the massive government takeover of healthcare that President Obama forced on the American people is not the right approach.  Obamacare raises taxes on small businesses that are vital job creators.  Seventy percent of North Dakotans did not want this $1.7 trillion government takeover of healthcare that cuts Medicare by $716 billion, places a panel of bureaucrats in control of Medicare decisions, creates billions in new taxes on American families, and passes down a legacy of debt to our children and grandchildren.  I will continue to fight back against President Obama’s massive government overreach and work on behalf of North Dakota to put patients and their doctors — not government bureaucrats — back in control of their healthcare decisions.

Are term limits a good idea?  
I see both sides of the argument of term limits.  On one hand, I do not believe the Founding Fathers ever intended for Americans to make a career out of serving in public office.  However, to be fair, seniority in Congress has enabled elected officials to rise to influential positions that have given states like North Dakota a loud voice in Washington.  In some ways, every election serves as term limits because it lets the voters decide if their elected official is doing a good job and deserves to continue serving in public office.

Kent Conrad

U.S. Senator (D)

If you had the power to change one law, what would it be?
I think the filibuster rule in the Senate – which at one time was instituted for very valid reasons – has been abused far too often in recent years. If I had the power to change anything right now, it would be the way the procedural motions in the Senate have been abused, further preventing the world’s greatest deliberative body from accomplishing more of the things the nation really needs.

How do you keep your constituents informed on issues?  
First and foremost, for 26 years I’ve made meeting with constituents face to face a top priority. Holding meetings in each of our great state’s 53 counties was my annual goal and I’ve succeeded more often than not. Additionally, I’ve consistently tried to keep my website updated with the latest developments in Washington. Additionally, I have made it a practice to respond to each and every letter sent to me from a North Dakotan. Finally, I regularly send out “issue update” emails to those requesting information via electronic mail.

Are term limits a good idea?  
I’ve always thought elections every two, four or six years were essentially an opportunity for the electorate to decide for itself whether an individual was fulfilling his or her responsibilities to the state. Additionally, to the people in states like North Dakota with comparatively sparse populations, seniority has always held greater importance.

John Hoeven

U.S. Senator (R)

If you had the power to change one law, what would it be?
I would change the approach we take to all laws that adversely affect the nation’s business environment with no real benefit to people. In North Dakota we worked for over a decade to build a legal, tax and regulatory climate that would encourage innovation and invite investment. I believe we’re seeing the product of that effort today in a growing, more diversified economy, higher income and thousands of new jobs.

How do you keep your constituents informed on issues?
We use a range of means to keep North Dakotans informed, including news releases, Facebook, Twitter and public events. What I like best is traveling our state to talk with people. I love to highlight the good things that North Dakotans are doing everywhere in our state – a new business in Minot, a great school in West Fargo, a beautiful new housing development in Williston, and the countless other great things that are transforming our state.

Are term limits a good idea?  
It’s up to voters to decide in every election how long a public official serves. It’s important for people to exercise their civic duty to be informed and vote.

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